In the backdrop of US ramping a conflict over the trade war and putting its diplomatic relations with China in a tizzy over Huawei, a Communist Party of China (CPC) Senior standing committee member told ET, the United States does not have any evidence proving the Huawei chips spying allegations.
Talking to ET about the controversy, Mu Degui, Member of the standing committee of CPC Guizhou Provincial Committee, DG of CPC Guizhou Provincial Publicity department, said that they isn’t much proof that the technology of Huawei chip is not secure. Degui said, “I don’t know where they got the information that our chips are not secure.” Nudging US, he emphasized, “they (US) dont have the evidence at all.”
Stating that Guizhou Province signed a “strategic cooperation framework” with Huawei, Degui pointed fingers at the US and said that in fact it was the US that shouldn’t be trusted with any information. He said, “we know that after the incident of Edward Snowden, the United States is not safe at all.” Snowden, a former National Security Agency subcontractor allegedly leaked documents revealing the NSA’s use of US-made telecom equipment for spying on Huawei.
Degui also said the government of China “doesn’t have any kind of requirement from companies to share data with the government.”
“We don’t know what the reason is behind the US banning Huawei,” Degui further said.
In 2017, China passed a ‘National Intelligence Law’, which aims to compel Chinese citizens and organizations to support it’s national intelligence and security agencies. Ren Zhengfei, the founder of Huawei, is a former member of People’s Liberation Army(PLA).
Talking exclusively to ET on the same matter, Han Shaobo, Deputy Director of Guizhou Provincial Big Data Bureau said, what the US is doing is because of its “economic problems”, and blocking Huawei is a part of their “strategy”.
On 29th May, Huawei filed a motion for summary judgment as part of the process to challenge the constitutionality of Section 889 of the 2019 National Defense Authorization Act (2019 NDAA) which aims to ban Huawei equipment and services.
Song Liuping, Huawei’s chief legal officer said, banning Huawei was just an excuse and “will do nothing to make networks more secure. The move only provides a false sense of security, and distracts attention from the real challenges.”
He also said, “politicians in the US are using the strength of an entire nation to come after a private company, and this has almost never been seen in history.”
In line with a court scheduling order, a hearing on the motion is set for Sept. 19.
China recently successfully concluded the 5th edition of the International Big Data Expo in Guiyang, amid the US-China face-off.
In a congratulatory note, President Xi Jinping called for international cooperation around digitisation and said the countries need to strengthen ties and deepen exchanges to jointly grasp the opportunities of digitalization. Xi Jinping said, “countries need to jointly grasp the opportunities of digitalization, networking, intelligence development, and handle the challenges of big data development in law, security, and governance.”
The Guiyang investment document tracker with ET states Guiyang as a possible hub for “Military-Civilian integration”, stating Guiyang will expand and strengthen the main business of military industry, encourage and support the “military enterprise transferring to civilian application” and civilian enterprises participating in the military application”, focus on the high end equipment manufacturing and the new generation of electronic information technology with the bases concentrating in the economic development zone, high tech zone and promote development of the military civilian integration industry. Guiyang is tipped as the Big Data hub by the Chinese government, and cutting edge technology forms the hallmark of the big data industry being set up in the south west of China.
Talking at the side-lines of the Big Data Expo 2019 in Guiyang, China, Australian technological expert Flavio Villansurate said, “if companies are operating fairly and according to global law and trade regulations they have right to access the (global) markets. If not they shouldn’t.”
India is expected to launch the 5G spectrum trials sometime soon and the controversial company Huawei is likely to be a top contender. TRAI white paper states India aims to start commercial roll-out of 5G services by 2020.

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